Tag: Planets

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  • Venus

    Venus is Earth’s closest neighbor and the planet most like it in terms of size and geology. It is a rugged world of volcanic mountains, canyons, high plateaus, and sweeping volcanic planes crisscrossed by riverlike magma channels. Much of the surface is …

  • Mercury

    The closest planet to the sun has a mass comparable to Luna but is a great deal denser due to its iron-nickel core. Mercury rotates slowly and has no atmosphere, so that its day side is hot enough to melt most metals, while its night side is bitterly cold …

  • Luna

    The first planetary body to host permanent human habitation, Earth’s sole moon is home to the second largest population of transhumanity on a single planet and remains a lynchpin of culture and economic activity. Lunar history has been shaped dramatically …

  • Mars

    Earth was the cradle of transhuman civilization, but Mars, with a population of 200 million, is now its heartland. When humanity began its spaceward diaspora, Luna was its first stop. Yet while Luna boasts a sizable population, Mars was the first world …

  • Jupiter

    Large enough that it could almost have formed the nucleus of a protostar in its own right, Jupiter’s massive size makes the Jovian System one of the most challenging places in the system to colonize. Jupiter’s powerful magnetic field means that its inner …

  • Europe

    Europa has no atmosphere and lies within the fearsome magnetosphere of Jupiter, and as such its surface is bombarded with enough radiation for an unshielded transhuman to receive an irrevocably fatal dosage within a few days—much faster when Europa’s …

  • Ganymede and Callisto

    Nearly as large in size as Luna, but darkly colored and not as heavily cratered, Ganymede and Callisto are very similar worlds. Neither is as dense (nor has as much gravity), as their mantles consist of more ice than iron rock. Both possess abundant …

  • Saturn

    The second largest planet in the system is a much more favorable habitat for transhumans than Jupiter. Saturn’s lower gravity and milder magnetosphere are a boon to gas mining operations, and for resourcehungry habs, the Rings are a feast (literally, in …

  • Titan

    Saturn’s largest moon is shrouded in a permanent orange atmospheric haze, hellishly cold (averaging 180 degrees below), and whipped by winds produced by tidal forces four times stronger than those influencing the Earth’s climate. On its face, it appears …

  • Uranus

    Once thought of as gas giants like Saturn and Jupiter, Uranus and Neptune differ from the larger planets in that they contain large amounts of water ice, methane, and ammonia and have rocky cores at their centers. This region of the system is sparsely …

  • Neptune

    Frigid, swept by 2,100 km/h winds, and tinged blue by methane traces in its atmosphere, Neptune is the last major planet in the system, orbiting at a distance of 30 AU from the sun. This far from the nearest star, plants will not grow and solar power is …

  • The edge of the system

    Beyond Neptune lie only dwarf planets and icy asteroids waiting to become comets, roughly divided into two regions: the Kuiper Belt, from 30 to 55 AU from the Sun, and the Scattered Disk, which extends from 55 AU out to the Oort Cloud. Pluto, its binary …